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Psychology Minor

The Psychology minor is intended to provide students with an overview of psychology and the opportunity to explore areas of psychology that most closely correspond to their interests and goals. This minor can be combined with any major and minor except the Psychology major and APS major with a concentration in psychology.

Psychology Minor Requirements (18 credits)

At least 9 credits in the minor must be at the 3000 level.

PSYC 1020 - Introduction to Psychology (3 credits) OR PSYC 1020H - Introduction to Psychology Honors (3 credits)

PSYC 1020 - Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)

An introduction to theory, research, and applications in the field of psychology. Topics include biological bases of behavior, perception, learning and memory, psychological development, personality, social psychology, and the identification and treatment of mental illness.

PSYC 1020H - Introduction to Psychology Honors (3 credits)

An introduction to theory, research, and applications in the field of psychology. Topics include biological bases of behavior, perception, learning and memory, psychological development, personality, social psychology, and the identification and treatment of mental illness. Prerequisite: Honors students only.

PSYC 3710 - History and Theories of Psychology (3 credits) OR PSYC 3760 - Multicultural Issues in Psychology (3 credits)

PSYC 3710 - History and Theories of Psychology (3 credits)

Exploration of the historical roots of psychology, and the bases and growth of psychology as a science. Examines the major historical and contemporary theories of psychology with an emphasis on enduring issues. Prerequisite: PSYC 1020 or PSYC 1020H.

PSYC 3760 - Multicultural Issues in Psychology (3 credits)

Issues relevant to the field of psychology. Examinations of different cultural groups and their values as they pertain to the individual, the family, time, proxemics (personal and interpersonal space), communication styles, and body language. Different cultural worldviews will be explored as they pertain to locus of control, conception of mental illness, and attitude toward seeking psychological help. Prerequisite: PSYC 1020 or PSYC 1020H. 

Select 12 credits from the following courses:

PSYC 2010 - Cognitive Processes (3 credits)

This course will provide an introduction to experiments (methods and results) and theory in cognitive psychology. Topics covered will include object recognition, attention, memory, concepts, language, imagery, problem solving and reasoning and the neural bases of cognitive processes. Prerequisite: PSYC 1020 or PSYC 1020H.

PSYC 2020 - Foundations of Clinical and Counseling Psychology (3 credits)

This course serves as an overview of Clinical and Counseling Psychology including a discussion of the training and employment of clinical/counseling psychologists; the assessment tools and treatment approaches routinely utilized by clinical/counseling psychologists; subspecialties of clinical and counseling psychology; and current trends and emerging issues in the field of clinical/counseling psychology. Various other related counseling professions are discussed throughout the course. Prerequisite: PSYC 1020 or PSYC 1020H. 

PSYC 2100 - Biological Bases of Behavior (3 credits)

This course provides a survey of genetic, neural, and endocrine bases of behavior. Focus topics include brain neuroanatomy, neural communication, sensory processes, motivation, emotion, and arousal. Prerequisite: PSYC 1020 or PSYC 1020H. 

PSYC 2160 - Social Psychology (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to the scientific study of how people's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by the real or imagined presence of other people. Topics such as self-perception, judgment and decision-making, rationalization, attitude change, conformity, social influence, obedience, attraction, love, aggression, violence, altruism, deception, nonverbal communication, and prejudice will be covered. Prerequisite: PSYC 1020 or PSYC 1020H.

PSYC 2350 - Life-Span Human Development (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of systematic changes within the individual from conception through death. Unlike many studies of development, this course is structured around issues of development rather than examination of development from a chronological perspective. This structure will allow the student to more completely grasp life-span issues. Family, social roles, lifestyle, psychological disorders, mental abilities, and death and dying will be examined. Prerequisite: PSYC 1020 or PSYC 1020H. 

PSYC 3000 - Psychological Research Methods (3 credits)

This course covers the methodological tools used in psychological research studies, with specific emphasis on observational, correlational, experimental, and quasi-experimental designs. Students will develop testable hypotheses, design a quantitative experimental research study, and use APA-format to write a report similar to those found in professional psychological journals. Prerequisites: PSYC 2900.

PSYC 3210 - Personality (3 credits)

Survey of psychoanalytic, humanistic, cognitive, and behavioral theories of personality. Current issues and personality research. Prerequisites: PSYC 1020 or PSYC 1020H. 

PSYC 3260 - Abnormal Psychology (3 credits)

Diagnoses, causes, and prognoses for the various categories of psychological disorders. Case studies supplement and illustrate theory and research. Prerequisite: PSYC 1020 or PSYC 1020H. 

PSYC 3520 - Principles of Learning (3 credits)

Principles of Learning examines theories and research concerning the basic principles and concepts of learning. Theories of classical and operant conditioning will be explored, in addition to selected theories which explore the interaction between learning, memory and motivation. Additionally, basic neuroanatomy and neurochemistry underlying various learning processes will also be introduced. Prerequisite: PSYC 1020 or PSYC 1020H.

The academic program and curriculum requirements listed on this page are from the 2016-2017 edition of the NSU Undergraduate Student Catalog. Students are bound by policies and curricula published in the catalog in effect the semester they enter the university, unless an agreement is made with appropriate NSU administration officials allowing them to abide by policies published in a later catalog.

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